Dublin Marks Yoga Day At The National University of Ireland

The Capital of the Republic of Ireland observes the function with attendees, including officials like Indian Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra and several Yoga enthusiasts.
FILE PHOTO: The Indian Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra and his wife Reeti Mishra perform Yoga during the 8th Yoga Day celebrations at the National University of Ireland, Dublin.
FILE PHOTO: The Indian Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra and his wife Reeti Mishra perform Yoga during the 8th Yoga Day celebrations at the National University of Ireland, Dublin.Indian Embassy in Ireland
FILE PHOTO: Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra addresses Yoga enthusiasts at the National University of Ireland in Dublin.
FILE PHOTO: Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra addresses Yoga enthusiasts at the National University of Ireland in Dublin.Indian Embassy in Ireland
FILE PHOTO: Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra with Participants perform yoga asanas at the National University of Ireland in Dublin.
FILE PHOTO: Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra with Participants perform yoga asanas at the National University of Ireland in Dublin.Indian Embassy in Ireland

By Himani Bhatt

The Indian Embassy in Dublin, Ireland, celebrates the 8th International Day of Yoga (IDY) at the National University of Ireland, Galway, on June 18. Held in partnership with a charitable organization, Heartfulness Ireland, the event was themed “Yoga for Humanity.” The Indian diaspora and native Irish inhabitants attended the special event in the Capital of the Republic of Ireland.

Earlier, the Embassy posted an invitation for the event on its social media page to motivate Yoga lovers to participate. The event started at 10 a.m. and continued till 11:30 a.m.


Since 2015, Yoga Day has been observed globally on June 21 to spread awareness about its benefits. The Indian Ambassador Akhilesh Mishra addressed Yoga enthusiasts with a compelling speech. Citing a Sanskrit quote, he said, “The vision of Indian thought, Indian philosophy has been to seek the well-being of the entire human being, entire living being as part of one single ecosystem. Therefore, it is not narrowly focused on an individual’s well-being or happiness.”

Previously, the Indian Embassy posted an official message on its Facebook (Meta Platforms Inc.) page explaining the history and importance of Yoga and IDY celebrations in Ireland with a video message by Mishra.

A charitable organization, Hope Foundation, also hosted a Yoga session on June 21 in Dublin. The Ambassador and his wife, Reeti Mishra, participated in the function with various Yoga enthusiasts.


Indo-Irish Cultural Relationship

India and Ireland share a healthy cultural and commercial relationship that continues to thrive in the 21st century. The Indian Embassy is considering proposals for establishing Yoga or Ayurveda Chairs in crucial varsities in Ireland. The practice of Yoga is generally extensive. Ayurvedic and other homeopathic systems are also increasing in popularity. Even before Ireland and India attained independence, both countries were closely related in literature and education. The Irish spiritual orders established several schools in India, and many of them operate till now.


Many Indian students visit the country to study biotechnology, ICT (Information and Communication Technology), business, and cloud computing. In addition, the native Irish citizens back the Indian populace for many cultural events, showcasing multiple states.

One of the primary functions of the cultural schedule is the annual Indian Film Festival. It includes screening modern films, engaging numerous directors/actors, and confined panel discussions. Also, the Embassy conducts annual Indian tourism functions and road shows. The total trade of Ireland with India amounts to the US $1.137 bn (2019-2020). While India’s export to the country aggregates at USD 533.69 million, the imports are equivalent to USD 604.15 million.


India-Ireland Ties: A Brief Glance

In 1947, India was the First Nation throughout Asia, with which Ireland set up official diplomatic connections. Over the years, both countries have bonded well in education, tourism, cultural, trade, and investment sectors. For example, the Ireland-India Council (IIC) arranges cultural exhibitions, events, documentary shows, and films and offers cultural agreement training to various functions, like institutions, companies, and students.


Presently, about 45,000 Indian origin residents in Ireland, of which nearly 26,500 are People of Indian origin (PIOs) and almost 18,500 are Non-Resident Indians (NRIs). Most are in Information Technology (IT), health care, engineering, and senior executive designations. They have blended well into the Irish community with a good reputation.


A well-known instance of Indo-Irish connection is that the former Irish PM and the current Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade, and Employment have Indian lineage. His father is of Indian descent, while his mother is Irish.

Also, the friendship between the Irish poet WB Yeats and the Indian polymathic Rabindra Nath Tagore forms a relevant part of their societal contact.

The NRI Nation
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